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'Thames Revival' on BBC Radio

Having been declared biologically dead in 1957, the river Thames has been making a real comeback. As well as porpoises, seals and the odd whale, over 156 species of fish currently live there.

The latest episode of 'Costing the Earth' talks about the monitoring and restoration work that has taken place.We are proud to say that many of the organisations featured are part of the Partnership. They discuss the current status of the Thames, and what the future holds.

Image from the BBC website. The episode is presented by Helen Czerski, a physicist from University College London who is co-ordinating a large-scale study of the River Thames. It was produced by Alasdair Cross.

You can listen online here.

A small, silver coloured fish is held up in a clear container with a ruler lining the bottom. Three onlookers stand in the background. One wears a bright blue shirt emblazoned with 'The Marine Biology Association' above the logo of  a seahorse in yellow

Riverfly Partnership Newsletter Vol. 4 Issue 3

image of a myfly on a green background with the words Volume four, issue three across it

Please Click Here for our latest newsletter. This issue contains information on the current status of ARMI, funding advice for coordinators, changes that may occur due to Brexit, and some details on the recent name changes of British mayflies.

If you have signed up for our newsletter you will receive this via email. In case you have not signed up but would like to, please click here.

Beautiful Identification Sheet; the True Mayfly or Greendrake by Lincolnshire Chalk Streams Project

Wonderful volunteers from the Lincolnshire Chalk Streams Project have been collaborating with the EA to create a set of beautiful identification sheets. A pair of true mayfly larvae, or greendrake are shown, The triangular shape of the markings on their bodies are pointed out with red labels

Click here for a PDF of their True Mayfly or 'Greendrake' identification sheet 

Rachel Graham, assisted initially by Jade Oliver has worked extensively on the identification sheets. The photographs have been supplied by John Boulton. The project is managed by Lincolnshire Chalk Streams Monitoring Officer Will Bartle, and the EA contacts who provided ecological expertise are Richard Chadd and Chris Extence. 

The Lincolnshire Chalk Streams Project is a collaboration between Anglian Water, Wild Trout Trust, Natural England, Lincolshire County Council, Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust, The Environment Agency, and their host; Lincolnshire Wolds Countryside Service. 

They have done outstanding work to improve and restore chalkstreams in Lincolnshire, as well as raising awareness and knowledge of chalk streams and their importance. In 2012 they were awarded the prestigious Bowland Award from the National Association for Areas of Outstanding national Beauty. This award acknowledges outstanding projects that achieve landscape scale conservation through partnership working.

We will be uploading more of their sheets in the future. We hope that you enjoy their wonderful work. 

Volunteer Hanifah Master writes about her experience monitoring rivers

 

I started to volunteer for the Mersey Rivers Trust after I noticed a misconnection in a local culvert and wanted to do something to help monitor that brook at different sites. I attended a River Guardian induction and training session and got paired up with another volunteer local to me and it has been almost a year since I began volunteering with the project.

 

It's great to know that the monthly data we input is being collated to be part of a database that will hopefully help map out the conditions of local waterways and the issues they face. I hope over time to get a better idea of the misconnections in my local area, and help assist in improving the local waterways for people and wildlife.

 

A woman conducts a kick sample in a river, she looks down at the net, the bankside and vegetation is visibel in the background

Naturally, I progressed onto doing the kick sampling training a few months later and wanted to understand how certain species of aquatic invertebrates can be an indicator of water quality. With certain species being less tolerant to pollution than others, I have also learnt that the presence or absence of a species can provide a brief snapshot of river health. Kick sampling, was my first real insight into aquatic invertebrates, and I was really surprised by the whole over world that exists on the stream bed of the river, I find it really fascinating!

 

I am very fortunate to be a volunteer in the Riverfly Partnership, as I have gained first-hand experience and knowledge. Furthermore, being responsible for surveying a set of sample sites really has opened my eyes as to why it is so important that we help protect, maintain and restore our waterways now more than ever.

 

Hanifah Master

Countryfile on Chalk Streams

tv logo showing a river and river bank on the screen The television show Countryfile recently aired an episode on Chalkstreams, now available online via BBC iPlayer.  

It runs through many aspects of our wonderful chalk streams and the work people are doing to conserve them. Some of our partners are featured, including Dr Janina Gray from Salmon and Trout Conservation, and Dr Cyril Bennet, one of our founding members. 

You can view the episode online via BBC iPlayer here. It will be available until the second week of June.

 

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