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'Thames Revival' on BBC Radio

Having been declared biologically dead in 1957, the river Thames has been making a real comeback. As well as porpoises, seals and the odd whale, over 156 species of fish currently live there.

The latest episode of 'Costing the Earth' talks about the monitoring and restoration work that has taken place.We are proud to say that many of the organisations featured are part of the Partnership. They discuss the current status of the Thames, and what the future holds.

Image from the BBC website. The episode is presented by Helen Czerski, a physicist from University College London who is co-ordinating a large-scale study of the River Thames. It was produced by Alasdair Cross.

You can listen online here.

A small, silver coloured fish is held up in a clear container with a ruler lining the bottom. Three onlookers stand in the background. One wears a bright blue shirt emblazoned with 'The Marine Biology Association' above the logo of  a seahorse in yellow

Riverfly Partnership Newsletter Vol. 4 Issue 3

image of a myfly on a green background with the words Volume four, issue three across it

Please Click Here for our latest newsletter. This issue contains information on the current status of ARMI, funding advice for coordinators, changes that may occur due to Brexit, and some details on the recent name changes of British mayflies.

If you have signed up for our newsletter you will receive this via email. In case you have not signed up but would like to, please click here.

Countryfile on Chalk Streams

tv logo showing a river and river bank on the screen The television show Countryfile recently aired an episode on Chalkstreams, now available online via BBC iPlayer.  

It runs through many aspects of our wonderful chalk streams and the work people are doing to conserve them. Some of our partners are featured, including Dr Janina Gray from Salmon and Trout Conservation, and Dr Cyril Bennet, one of our founding members. 

You can view the episode online via BBC iPlayer here. It will be available until the second week of June.

 

The Ver to be featured on Countryfile this Easter Sunday

Logo of a tv showing a stylised view of a river and river bank

The Chairman of the Ver Valley Society, John Pritchard will be on Countryfile this Sunday as he talks about low flow along the Ver.

The Ver Valley Society are one of our partners, and they conduct Riverfly monitoring with their dedicated volunteers. 

The programme will air at 19:00 on Sunday 21st on BBC One, and will be available via BBC iPlayer after that.  

Please click here for the the Ver Valley Society website. They also have a Facebook Page, and are active on Twitter.

 

The Hunt for Red February

The Northern February red stonefly (Brachyptera putata) is a rare species of stonefly. Its stronghold is in the Scottish Highlands, and it has only been spotted on two rivers outside Scotland; the Usk in Wales, and the Wye near Hereford, where it is now thought to be locally extinct.

Buglife's Craig Macadam, with the support of Sottish Natural Heritage and Caignorms National Park Authority, has produced a report on the species. During recent surveys it was found that winter sun is of great importance to the adult Northern February red, who enjoy 'basking' on fenceposts near the river. This has been identified as a useful technique for monitoring them.

Volunteers have recently used this method to find them on the River Dee at Balmoral and the River Conon near Maybank- which is the first time this species have been recorded on the Conon!

“Discovering a new site for the Northern February red stonefly on the River Conon is fantastic. By getting more people spotting stoneflies we can start to fill in the gaps in our understanding of where the Northern February red stonefly lives, which helps with planning action to help this species to survive.”- Craig Macadam, Conservation Director at Buglife

Anyone who is out and about near a river is encouraged to look out for the adults sunning themselves on fenceposts. They have three distinctive bands across their wings, and February- March is the perfect time of year to spot them. New records are vital to increasing understanding and distribution of this species.

Members of the public can get involved by taking a photo and sending it to scotland@buglife.org.uk or tweeting it to @buglifescotland.More information is available on BugLife's survey flyer available Here

To see the original Scottish Natural Heritage article this is based on please click here. Photo credits: Gus Jones and Stewart Taylor.

Adult Northern February red stoneflies basking on the top and one side of a wooden fence post.

 

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