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New Brown Trout Discovered at Loch Laidon

A new type of brown trout has been discovered at Loch Laidon in Perthshire. Researchers used systematic sampling techniques and DNA analysis to identify four types of brown trout living in the loch that are genetically, ecologically and morphologically distinct from one another.  

The deep water, bottom feeder or 'profundal benthivore' is new to science. Similar quartets have been observed in other species such as the Arctic charr, but never for brown trout. The profundal benthivore is paler than the other trout in the loch, and has much larger eyes and mouth.  

The findings present exciting possibilities about the diversity of freshwater lakes in the Northern hemisphere. 

'Findings such as those for Loch Laidon may well be the tip of a biodiversity iceberg in Scottish and other northern lakes, the true size of this iceberg will only become clear once we study more lakes using methods such as those we employed'. - Professor Verspoor

The four brown trout types from Loch Laidon

The study was conducted through the Rivers and Lochs Institute at UHI Inverness College by Professor Eric Verspoor, Mark Coulson, Ronald Greer and David Knox. The paper was published in the journal Freshwater Biology and can be accessed online here.

Last Training Events of the Season

 

The last few training events of the season are coming up. 

Training is a must if you would like to become an ARMI monitor. The one day workshops include a practical, cover the theory, and go through everything you need to get started. 

For more information please see the 'Diary of Events' page linked Here.

 

Volunteers Help To Monitor Rare Chalk Streams

Experts from the Environment Agency recently delivered a training session via the Riverfly Partnership to ARMI monitors on the Great Eau, a rare chalk stream in Lincolnshire. 

Chalk streams are almost exclusively found in England. They feature aquifers that give rise to clean and clear water. Their unique geology and conditions support a vast array of wildlife. 

The Lincolnshire chalk streams project now has an incredible 42 volunteers surveying at 34 key sites in and around the Lincolnshire Wolds AONB. 

The work achieved by volunteers has proved invaluable for reporting non-native species and for monitoring recovery following pollution events in the area. 

It's absolutely fantastic that so many volunteers are willing to dedicate their time to monitoring the chalk streams, and to learn how to survey riverflies- a vital part of the delicate chalk stream ecosystem.

-Will Bartle, monitoring officer, Lincolnshire Chalk Streams Project 

For more details, including how to get involved in next seasons training event, please click here. 

New ARMI volunteers needed in Yorkshire

The Totally Thames Festival is in Full Swing

Totally Thames, presented by the Thames Festival Trust, is a festival that runs throughout September and hosts a myriad of Thames inspired events across London.

There are boat races, archaelogical walks, a riverside concert, an art exhibition, talks and more. All inspired by  the great river. 

For a full programme please CLICK HERE for their events page. 

 

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