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Beautiful Identification Sheet; the True Mayfly or Greendrake by Lincolnshire Chalk Streams Project

Wonderful volunteers from the Lincolnshire Chalk Streams Project have been collaborating with the EA to create a set of beautiful identification sheets. A pair of true mayfly larvae, or greendrake are shown, The triangular shape of the markings on their bodies are pointed out with red labels

Click here for a PDF of their True Mayfly or 'Greendrake' identification sheet 

Rachel Graham, assisted initially by Jade Oliver has worked extensively on the identification sheets. The photographs have been supplied by John Boulton. The project is managed by Lincolnshire Chalk Streams Monitoring Officer Will Bartle, and the EA contacts who provided ecological expertise are Richard Chadd and Chris Extence. 

The Lincolnshire Chalk Streams Project is a collaboration between Anglian Water, Wild Trout Trust, Natural England, Lincolshire County Council, Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust, The Environment Agency, and their host; Lincolnshire Wolds Countryside Service. 

They have done outstanding work to improve and restore chalkstreams in Lincolnshire, as well as raising awareness and knowledge of chalk streams and their importance. In 2012 they were awarded the prestigious Bowland Award from the National Association for Areas of Outstanding national Beauty. This award acknowledges outstanding projects that achieve landscape scale conservation through partnership working.

We will be uploading more of their sheets in the future. We hope that you enjoy their wonderful work. 

Volunteer Hanifah Master writes about her experience monitoring rivers

 

I started to volunteer for the Mersey Rivers Trust after I noticed a misconnection in a local culvert and wanted to do something to help monitor that brook at different sites. I attended a River Guardian induction and training session and got paired up with another volunteer local to me and it has been almost a year since I began volunteering with the project.

 

It's great to know that the monthly data we input is being collated to be part of a database that will hopefully help map out the conditions of local waterways and the issues they face. I hope over time to get a better idea of the misconnections in my local area, and help assist in improving the local waterways for people and wildlife.

 

A woman conducts a kick sample in a river, she looks down at the net, the bankside and vegetation is visibel in the background

Naturally, I progressed onto doing the kick sampling training a few months later and wanted to understand how certain species of aquatic invertebrates can be an indicator of water quality. With certain species being less tolerant to pollution than others, I have also learnt that the presence or absence of a species can provide a brief snapshot of river health. Kick sampling, was my first real insight into aquatic invertebrates, and I was really surprised by the whole over world that exists on the stream bed of the river, I find it really fascinating!

 

I am very fortunate to be a volunteer in the Riverfly Partnership, as I have gained first-hand experience and knowledge. Furthermore, being responsible for surveying a set of sample sites really has opened my eyes as to why it is so important that we help protect, maintain and restore our waterways now more than ever.

 

Hanifah Master

Freshwater Science Volume 38 Number 2

cover of the journal freshwater science showing a figure standing among plants wiith a mountain range in the backgroundAlthough ARMI has been established throughout the UK for more than ten years, peer reviewed publications about the program have been fairly limited.
 
However, a paper titled Anglers’ Riverfly Monitoring Initiative (ARMI): A UK-wide citizen science project for water quality assessment, authored by Riverfly Partnership Chair, Stephen J. Brooks, ARMI Project Manager, Ben Fitch, FBA Honorary Research Fellow, John Davy-Bowker, and aquatic ecologist, Soraya Alvarez Codesal, was published in a Citizen Science special edition of the journal Freshwater Science in June 2019.
 
This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of ARMI as a structured citizen science program in enhancing the environmental protection of rivers, shows how ARMI complements the work of statutory authorities, and describes how ARMI promotes community engagement with river environments. Click HERE for more information. 

Wildlife photographer and angler, Jack Perks completes epic mission to film every UK freshwater fish species underwater

By filming one of the UK's rarest freshwater fish species, the Allis Shad, Jack Perks completed a seven year project to film every UK freshwater fish species underwater. Watch Jack's film for free: Every UK Freshwater Fish Filmed Underwater

The Hunt for Red February

The Northern February red stonefly (Brachyptera putata) is a rare species of stonefly. Its stronghold is in the Scottish Highlands, and it has only been spotted on two rivers outside Scotland; the Usk in Wales, and the Wye near Hereford, where it is now thought to be locally extinct.

Buglife's Craig Macadam, with the support of Sottish Natural Heritage and Caignorms National Park Authority, has produced a report on the species. During recent surveys it was found that winter sun is of great importance to the adult Northern February red, who enjoy 'basking' on fenceposts near the river. This has been identified as a useful technique for monitoring them.

Volunteers have recently used this method to find them on the River Dee at Balmoral and the River Conon near Maybank- which is the first time this species have been recorded on the Conon!

“Discovering a new site for the Northern February red stonefly on the River Conon is fantastic. By getting more people spotting stoneflies we can start to fill in the gaps in our understanding of where the Northern February red stonefly lives, which helps with planning action to help this species to survive.”- Craig Macadam, Conservation Director at Buglife

Anyone who is out and about near a river is encouraged to look out for the adults sunning themselves on fenceposts. They have three distinctive bands across their wings, and February- March is the perfect time of year to spot them. New records are vital to increasing understanding and distribution of this species.

Members of the public can get involved by taking a photo and sending it to scotland@buglife.org.uk or tweeting it to @buglifescotland.More information is available on BugLife's survey flyer available Here

To see the original Scottish Natural Heritage article this is based on please click here. Photo credits: Gus Jones and Stewart Taylor.

Adult Northern February red stoneflies basking on the top and one side of a wooden fence post.

 

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