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The Riverfly Partnership

The Riverfly Partnership is a dynamic network of organisations, representing anglers, conservationists, entomologists, scientists, water course managers and relevant authorities, working together to: - protect the water quality of our rivers; - further the understanding of riverfly populations; - and actively conserve riverfly habitats. The Riverfly Partnership is hosted by the Freshwater Biological Association.

 

To join the mailing list please click here

Wildlife photographer and angler, Jack Perks completes epic mission to film every UK freshwater fish species underwater

By filming one of the UK's rarest freshwater fish species, the Allis Shad, Jack Perks completed a seven year project to film every UK freshwater fish species underwater. Watch Jack's film for free: Every UK Freshwater Fish Filmed Underwater

Countryfile on Chalk Streams

tv logo showing a river and river bank on the screen The television show Countryfile recently aired an episode on Chalkstreams, now available online via BBC iPlayer.  

It runs through many aspects of our wonderful chalk streams and the work people are doing to conserve them. Some of our partners are featured, including Dr Janina Gray from Salmon and Trout Conservation, and Dr Cyril Bennet, one of our founding members. 

You can view the episode online via BBC iPlayer here. It will be available until the second week of June.

 

The Hunt for Red February

The Northern February red stonefly (Brachyptera putata) is a rare species of stonefly. Its stronghold is in the Scottish Highlands, and it has only been spotted on two rivers outside Scotland; the Usk in Wales, and the Wye near Hereford, where it is now thought to be locally extinct.

Buglife's Craig Macadam, with the support of Sottish Natural Heritage and Caignorms National Park Authority, has produced a report on the species. During recent surveys it was found that winter sun is of great importance to the adult Northern February red, who enjoy 'basking' on fenceposts near the river. This has been identified as a useful technique for monitoring them.

Volunteers have recently used this method to find them on the River Dee at Balmoral and the River Conon near Maybank- which is the first time this species have been recorded on the Conon!

“Discovering a new site for the Northern February red stonefly on the River Conon is fantastic. By getting more people spotting stoneflies we can start to fill in the gaps in our understanding of where the Northern February red stonefly lives, which helps with planning action to help this species to survive.”- Craig Macadam, Conservation Director at Buglife

Anyone who is out and about near a river is encouraged to look out for the adults sunning themselves on fenceposts. They have three distinctive bands across their wings, and February- March is the perfect time of year to spot them. New records are vital to increasing understanding and distribution of this species.

Members of the public can get involved by taking a photo and sending it to scotland@buglife.org.uk or tweeting it to @buglifescotland.More information is available on BugLife's survey flyer available Here

To see the original Scottish Natural Heritage article this is based on please click here. Photo credits: Gus Jones and Stewart Taylor.

Adult Northern February red stoneflies basking on the top and one side of a wooden fence post.

 

New Brown Trout Discovered at Loch Laidon

A new type of brown trout has been discovered at Loch Laidon in Perthshire. Researchers used systematic sampling techniques and DNA analysis to identify four types of brown trout living in the loch that are genetically, ecologically and morphologically distinct from one another.  

The deep water, bottom feeder or 'profundal benthivore' is new to science. Similar quartets have been observed in other species such as the Arctic charr, but never for brown trout. The profundal benthivore is paler than the other trout in the loch, and has much larger eyes and mouth.  

The findings present exciting possibilities about the diversity of freshwater lakes in the Northern hemisphere. 

'Findings such as those for Loch Laidon may well be the tip of a biodiversity iceberg in Scottish and other northern lakes, the true size of this iceberg will only become clear once we study more lakes using methods such as those we employed'. - Professor Verspoor.

The study was conducted through the Rivers and Lochs Institute at UHI Inverness College by Professor Eric Verspoor, Mark Coulson, Ronald Greer and David Knox. The paper was published in the journal Freshwater Biology and can be accessed online here.

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